Flash Fiction Challenge: Choose Your Random Sentence

Flash Fiction Challenge: Choose Your Random Sentence (courtesy of terribleminds)

The challenge is to write a story based on a sentence spewed out by this sentence generator.

“THE HYPOTHETICAL RECIPIENT COMPROMISES THE DIAGNOSIS”

October 15, 1995

I stole some medical records from my primary care physician today.

Actually, I am sleeping with a nurse at the office and convinced her to photocopy the medical record of a recently diseased patient which she readily obliged in that tingly, after-sex fog that so definitively suspends our faculties.

I just put in my two weeks, she told me. So what do I care?

I was fogged up too and I don’t know why I did it but I did. And now I’m left to wonder how often the hypothetical recipient compromises the diagnosis and it costs a person their life.


PATIENT CHART                                  Bloomington Medical Group

PATIENT: Dillard, Anthony                 DATE: September 22, 1995

GENDER: Male                                       DOB: 04/08/1979

STATUS: Active Closed (patient deceased)

PROBLEM HISTORY:

ID: SOUC3    NAME: Osteomyelitis    STATUS: Active   PRIORITY: High
ID: SOUC1    NAME: Gangrene            STATUS: Active   PRIORITY: High

VISIT DIAGNOSIS: Progressive Gangrene in left foot as a result of untreated Osteomyelitis. Infection spreading to upper leg, blood stream. Patient’s condition serious. Recommend immediate amputation of left leg at upper thigh.

CHIEF COMPLAINTS: Loss of feeling in left leg, foul-smelling odor, delirium, fever, severe pain, shakes

VITALS: WT: 185 (83.9 kg), HT: 63 (160 cm), TMP: 100.3 (38 C). BP: 145/100

HISTORICAL DIAGNOSIS:

9/20/1995 — Patient admitted to Bloomington General for advanced stage Gangrene
7/25/1995 — Patient admitted to Bloomington General for alcohol poisoning
6/20/1995 — Progressive Gangrene identified, spreading to blood stream
6/10/1995 — Blood work returns positive for gangrene resulting from untreated Osteomyelitis
6/10/1995 — Blood work returns positive for Osteomyelitis at site of proximal phalanx fracture
6/6/1995 — Admitted to Bloomington General for severe dehydration
4/10/1994 — Fractured proximal phalanx of left big toe

ADDITIONAL NOTES: Patient delayed treatment of Osteomyelitis as a result of second opinion. Delay gave time for Osteomyelitis to progress, spread and turn Gangrene. Condition is serious. Containment might no longer be possible.


October 20, 1995

I’ve not talked to the nurse in a while.

I want to give the medical record back so that they can file it away somewhere next to other last names that start with D. 

I want to put the recently deceased out of my mind.

I want to forget about Anthony Dillard.

Advertisements

5 Comments

Filed under Featured Content, Flash Fiction, Flash Fiction Challenge: terribleminds, Writing

5 responses to “Flash Fiction Challenge: Choose Your Random Sentence

  1. I like how you handled this one! Quite a unique approach I think 🙂 As an aside a couple days ago my brother told me about a coworker who went in to get his toe removed for gangrene and woke up without a leg because the Doctors found it went farther than they thought. Bad stuff.

    Like

    • @onethemis

      First of all, thank you for letting me know that my link was broken the other day.

      I appreciate you taking the time to read my work and leave your feedback. The prompt was challenging so I decided to experiment a little with form — I’m glad you enjoyed it.

      I am sorry to here about your brother’s coworker–I cannot begin to imagine those first waking moments, not to mention the days immediately following. It’s a reminder to me as a writer to remember that some of the things I put down on paper have happened to me and other people.

      Like

  2. Baba

    This, Martin, was double hard for me.

    Like

  3. Good interpretation of the prompt sentence. That was a tough one! I especially like how you incorporated the medical record itself into the story. That works very well.

    Like

Comments and lamentations:

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s